Deir el-Bahri


Deir el-Bahri
   Modern name for a site on the cliffs of the western bank of the Nileopposite Thebes. It was apparently first used to construct the tomb and mortuary temple of Mentuhotep II of Dynasty 11 and the tombs of his successors, as well as the chief officials of the court. During Dynasty 18 it was chosen as the site of the mortuary temple of Queen Hatshepsut, the building of which was supervised by her official, Senenmut. The temple is well preserved and is famous for its reliefs of the expedition to Punt and the transportation of an obelisk. Next to Deir el-Bahri a mortuary temple was constructed by Thutmose III, but this shrine has been largely destroyed by an earthquake, leaving only a pillared hall with Hathor capitals and a chapel. The site became a Coptic monastery during the Christian period but was later abandoned. Deir el-Bahri was first excavated by Auguste Mariette in 1850, 1862, and 1866. Major excavations were undertaken in the Hatshepsut temple from 1893–1896 and the Mentuhotep II temple from 1903–1907 by a British expedition of the Egypt Exploration Fund. Further work in the area was carried out by Herbert Winlock of the Metropolitan Museum of Art from 1911–1931. The Mentuhotep II temple was reexamined by a German expedition from 1965–1972, and the Hatshepsut temple has been the subject of excavation and restoration work by a Polish team since 1961, during which time the Thutmose III temple was also discovered.
Historical Dictionary Of Ancient Egypt by Morris L. Bierbrier

Ancient Egypt. A Reference Guide. . 2011.

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  • Deir el-Bahri — (Arabic دير البحري dayr al baḥrī , literally meaning, The Northern Monastery ) is a complex of mortuary temples and tombs located on the west bank of the Nile, opposite the city of Luxor, Egypt.In 1997, 58 tourists and 4 Egyptians were massacred… …   Wikipedia

  • Deir el-Bahri — Deir el Bahari (arab. „Nordkloster“), ist eine antike Nekropole in Ägypten, die nördlich von Theben auf der Westseite des Nils gegenüber der Stadt Luxor liegt. Neben zahlreichen Felsengräbern, darunter der wohl spektakulärste Fund, die… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Deir-el-bahri — Deir el Bahari 25°44′N 32°36′E / 25.733, 32.6 …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Deir el-Bahri — Deir el Bahari 25°44′N 32°36′E / 25.733, 32.6 …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Deir e-Bahari — Deir el Bahari (arab. „Nordkloster“), ist eine antike Nekropole in Ägypten, die nördlich von Theben auf der Westseite des Nils gegenüber der Stadt Luxor liegt. Neben zahlreichen Felsengräbern, darunter der wohl spektakulärste Fund, die… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Deir el-Bahari — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Deir el Bahari (árabe: دير البحري ) literalmente significa El convento del Norte y es un complejo de templos funerarios y tumbas que se encuentra en la ribera occidental del río Nilo, en el IV nomo del Alto Egipto,… …   Wikipedia Español

  • Deir el-Bahari — Djeser Djeseru – Hatshepsut s temple, the focal point of the complex. Deir el Bahari or Deir el Bahri (Arabic الدير البحري ad dayr al baḥrī, literally meaning, The Northern Monastery ) is a complex of mortuary temples and tombs located on… …   Wikipedia

  • Deir el-Bahari — Karte von Deir el Bahari I) Tempel des Mentuhotep II. 1) Bab el Hosan 2) Vestibül 3) Terrasse mit Kolonnade 4) Tumulus 5) Hypostyl 6) Sanktuarium II) Tempel des Thutmosis III. III) Tempel der Hatschepsut 7) Hof 8) Erster Portikus 9) Ziegeltempel… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Deir el-Medina — Ruins of Deir el Medina. A UNESCO World Heritage Site[1] Deir el Medina (Arabic: دير المدينة‎) is an ancient Egyptian village which was home to the artisans who worked on the tombs in the Valley of the …   Wikipedia

  • Bahri — bezeichnet: Al Chartum Bahri, Stadt im Sudan Debubawi Kayih Bahri, Region in Eritrea Semienawi Kayih Bahri, Region in Eritrea Bahri Dynastie, stellte von 1279 bis 1382 die Sultane der Mamluken in Ägypten Deir el Bahari, antike Nekropole in… …   Deutsch Wikipedia


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